Jamestown Historical Society

Author: Steve

A four-engine long-range B-24 Liberator bomber on which William Sweet was engineer for 18 missions over enemy territory during World War II.
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Brooks family lost three members during World War II

Few were left untouched by the global conflict, and 13 men from Jamestown died serving their country. The hardest-hit local family was the Brooks family. Eighty years ago, the United States was entering its second year of involvement in World War II.

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Fan
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Fans

This fan has been dated to the 18th century by the Textiles Department at URI. The donor was Mary Howland (Gardner) Clarke, the daughter of John Howland Gardner.

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Preston E. Peckham and his wife, Catherine, taking a chilly winter carriage ride. Participating in horse competition, pigeon races, and carriage parades, Preston, born in 1884, was considered one of the most colorful turn-of-the-century characters in Jamestown.
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Peckham men from farmers to ferryboats

John Peckham, a Newport freeholder, was one of Jamestown’s first landowners. Although he was not among the 101 men who signed the prepurchase agreement for Conanicut Island, his name appears on Joshua Fisher’s 1658 map.

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Clara Lewis, Teacher at Clarke School
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Clara Lewis, Teacher at Clarke School

Clara was the daughter of Clara Silvia Furtado and Manual Dutra Lewis who immigrated from Fayal Island Azores and were married January 14, 1906 in the Parish of St. Mary, Our Lady of the Isle in Newport.

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JHS Fall 2022 News Letter
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2022 Fall Newsletter

Our Fall 2022 Newsletter is now available for download. The JHS adopted a new Diversity Policy this year, which is reproduced in the report.

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Windmist Farm
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Jamestown’s Working Farms

From Jamestown’s very beginning to the present day, working farms make up a considerable portion of the acres on our island. According to a map produced in 1933 to show all the farms of Jamestown at the turn of the twentieth century, at that time most of the land was farmed.

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